Alex Meiser

Nothing Can Be Something

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Nothing Can Be Something

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Consisting of twelve fabric formations and three vitrines, the production of this project consumed the collapsed Fabric Fortress that previously inhabited the room. Every roll was meticulously fitted together in order to create a self-supporting greater whole. Being present moment to moment, physically and mentally, on one task is inherent to a craft tradition—one that is particularly present in the weaving of textiles. In this tradition the quality, and therefore the value of the finished product, is derived directly from the skill and experience of the craftsperson. The industrialization of these processes moves away from valuing the skill of human labor, and instead places emphasis on efficiency. In this new paradigm, there is a transformation from craftsperson to assembly line worker. Thus human labor and human value becomes lost in the polish and uniformity, leading inevitably to the complete replacement of these “human components”.

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Consisting of twelve fabric formations and three vitrines, the production of this project consumed the collapsed Fabric Fortress that previously inhabited the room. Every roll was meticulously fitted together in order to create a self-supporting greater whole. Being present moment to moment, physically and mentally, on one task is inherent to a craft tradition—one that is particularly present in the weaving of textiles. In this tradition the quality, and therefore the value of the finished product, is derived directly from the skill and experience of the craftsperson. The industrialization of these processes moves away from valuing the skill of human labor, and instead places emphasis on efficiency. In this new paradigm, there is a transformation from craftsperson to assembly line worker. Thus human labor and human value becomes lost in the polish and uniformity, leading inevitably to the complete replacement of these “human components”.